Workgroup: Doc. Vítězslav Bryja Ph.D.

Keywords

Wnt signaling, non-canonical Wnt pathway, proteomics, Dishevelled, β-arrestin, mass spectrometry, phosphorylation, cell signaling, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, ovarian tumors, extracellular vesicles
Head of laboratory: Doc. Vítězslav Bryja, Ph.D.
Office: 112 (Kamenice 5 – A36)
E-mail: bryja@sci.muni.cz
Phone: +420 54949 3291
Phone lab/students: +420 54949 6809/6811
Teaching
Publications

Points of interest

Morphogenetic proteins from the Wnt family are important regulators of embryonal development. They have also huge impact on homeostasis regulation of the adult organism. Deregulation of Wnt pathway leads to cancer and many other diseases. Although the significance of this family of proteins in the pathogenesis of diseases is widely accepted, we do not know much about the molecular mechanisms of their effect.

Wnt proteins bind to the membrane receptors from the Frizzled family, the signal is then transmitted onto the Dishevelled phosphoprotein – where is also analyzed and according to the nature of ligand or presence of co-receptors is then transmitted by at least one of four known signaling pathways. Molecular mechanisms determining how the signal will be transmitted on the level of Dishevelled, have not been discovered yet.

Our laboratory tries to contribute to understanding of some key molecular aspects of transmission of the Wnt signal between the Frizzled receptor, the protein Dishevelled and other proteins in the Wnt pathway. We try to apply these pieces of knowledge onto clinically relevant problems, e.g. pathogenesis of tumors or leukemia. We believe these findings will become the basis for identification of new therapeutic targets for curing the tumors caused by the Wnt pathway deregulation.

 

Methods

To study Wnt signaling we use all basic methods of biochemistry and molecular and cell biology. We frequently use the primary patient samples, which we obtain in cooperation with Faculty Hospital Brno. Alone or in colaboration we are trying to take advantage of the possibilities of state-of-the-art proteomics and to validate data in vivo using Caenorhabditis elegans, Xenopus laevis and Mus musculus as experimental models.

Group members

Postdoc